ALL CASTLES
within a radius of 50 km and useful addresses

We are at your disposal to organize a tour of castles.

Chenonceau castle

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www.chenonceau.com

Built in the 16th century under François I and Henri II.

The most original and the most visited of the Loire Valley castles (1 million visitors per year).

The “Château des Dames”: legitimate wives, favorites and queens were there for 400 years the happy or unhappy heroines (Diane de Poitiers, Catherine de Médicis, Louise de Lorraine,…).

The castle of Chambord

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www.chambord.org

Built in the 16th century by François the 1st.

A Renaissance masterpiece.

The castle of all superlatives :

  • The largest of the Loire Valley castles (156m by 112m)
  • 440 rooms, 365 windows and 83 stairs
  • 1800 workers contributed to its construction
  • 5000 ha estate

Our tip : Take the tour with a guide.

Cheverny castle

www.chateau-cheverny.fr

Built in the 17th century under Henry IV and Louis XIII.

The descendants of the builder, Count Hurault, still live in the castle.

Very well furnished with many paintings and tapestries.

Our tip : Look for the Castafiore accompanied by her faithful Wagner at the Château de Moulinsart

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The castle of Valençay

http://www.chateau-valencay.fr/

Around 1540, Jacques d´Estampes, the local lord, razed the ruins of the 12th century feudal castle and built the current castle in its place. Its vast proportions and the time of its construction give it a family resemblance with Chambord.

It is called the “castle of financiers” since its successive owners were farmer generals including the famous John Law, father of the 1st inflation !

Amboise castle

www.chateau-amboise.com/

On a rocky promontory, fortifications were erected in the Gallo-Roman era with already a bridge thrown over the river. They were transformed into 2 fortresses in the 11th century by the Counts of Amboise.

The 15th century was the golden age for Amboise, which Kings Louis XI and Charles VIII continued to expand and embellish. The castle will not know the influence of the Italian Renaissance, too advanced in its construction.

Our tip : In summer the sound and light show with costumed extras is worth it.

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The Clos Lucé

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The last home of Leonardo da Vinci.

www.vinci-closluce.com

Manor of pink bricks underlined with tufa stones acquired in the 15th century by Charles VIII and occupied in the 16th century by François I, who invited Leonardo da Vinci, who will remain there until his death.

Our tip : Do not miss the 40 fabulous machines in the basement (helicopter, tank, worm gear, etc.) imagined by this man who was at the same time painter, sculptor, musician, poet, architect, engineer and scholar , whose “eyes were 4 centuries ahead” !

The castle and gardens of Villandry

www.chateauvillandry.com

Villandry is one of the last great châteaux built on the banks of the Loire in the 16th century to the Renaissance.

But above all, it is one of the most beautiful gardens in France. The best overview of the multi-level gardens is from the terraces behind the castle or from the top of the keep. The beds form a veritable multicolored checkerboard, the squares of which are made of fruit trees, shrubs, vegetables, flowers, yews and clipped boxwood.

Our tip : a must see! It is extraordinary

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The castle of Azay-le-Rideau

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http://azay-le-rideau.monuments-nationaux.fr/

In the 16th century, Gilles Berthelot, the great financier, had the castle built in its current form. A little gem full of charm, harmony and elegance.

Our tip : Spend time outdoors and stroll in the park around the castle to soak up the atmosphere that is both peaceful and steeped in history.

Blois castle

www.chateaudeblois.fr/

Located on a vast esplanade, from the feudal period (13th century), there remains a tower and the Hall of the Estates General. The construction of the current castle was started by Louis XII in the 16th century.

Opposite the entrance, the Francis I wing in the purest Italian Renaissance style.

We note the famous staircase with an octagonal cage comprising a series of balconies from which the court witnessed the arrival of the great figures.

Our tip : Admire the paintings on the walls and ceilings which have been recently redone.

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The castle and gardens of Chaumont-sur-Loire

http://www.domaine-chaumont.fr/

Former fortress twice razed, the castle was rebuilt in the 15th and 16th centuries by Pierre d’Amboise and his grandson Charles II.

Queen Catherine de Medici acquires the castle to take revenge on Diane de Poitiers, favorite of her late husband Henri II.

She will force the latter to cede her favorite residence, Chenonceau, in exchange for Chaumont !

Our tip : More than the castle, the gardens are worth a visit, the scene of an annual international garden festival with very original animated compositions.

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Langeais castle

 www.langeais.fr

It was the Count of Anjou, Foulques Nerra, who built the first castle in the 10th century. The keep, whose ruins stand in the park, is said to be the oldest in France.

The current castle was built in 4 years with a single throw (rare!) By Louis XI in the 15th century to thwart any attempt by the Bretons to go up the Loire towards Nantes and Touraine.
This risk disappeared at the end of the 15th century by the marriage in Langeais itself, of Charles VIII with Anne of Brittany (marriage of convenience !).

Our tip : Do not miss a visit to the apartments, which are very lively with lots of furniture, tapestries and accessories reminiscent of seigneurial life in the 15th century and the beginning of the Renaissance.

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The castle of Lassay-sur-Croisnes

http://www.france-voyage.com/villes-villages/lassay-sur-croisne-14619/chateau-moulin-13405.htm

A pretty rural site surrounds the Château du Moulin, built at the end of the 15th century by Philippe du Moulin, a gentleman devoted to Kings Charles VIII and Louis XII. Originally built on the square plan of the fortresses, the castle was surrounded by walls reinforced by round towers. Fashionable in the 15th century, diamond-shaped brick buildings highlighted with stone chains are more graceful than military.

Loches castle

www.loches-tourainecotesud.com

The fortress of Loches protected the city for almost 1000 years since the 6th century.

The current castle underwent numerous modifications until the 16th century. He saw Henry II Plantagenet, Richard the Lionheart, Louis IX and Charles VII, as well as Joan of Arc and Agnès Sorel, the “Lady of Beauty”.

Our tip : You absolutely have to walk in the medieval city full of character and discover its ramparts.

Montpoupon castle

http://www.chateau-loire-montpoupon.com/

From an ancient 13th-century fortress, the towers remain. The main building, with mullioned windows and Gothic-style gables, dates from the 15th century. The entrance gatehouse with Renaissance decor dates from the early 16th century.

Our advice : Do not miss the visit of the main house and the rooms in the outbuildings where the life of the owners, the kitchens, the stables and the horse trades, not to mention the splendid museum of venery with its exceptional collection are reconstructed and staged. of Hermès squares on the theme of hunting with hounds.

In summer, demonstration of hunting with hounds.

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The castle of Montrésor

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 www.37-online.net/chateaux/montresor.html

The fortress was built in the 11th century by Foulques Nerra, of which there are powerful ramparts dotted with ruined towers. In the center of the enclosure stands the intact residential castle built in the 16th century by Imbert de Bastarnay, Lord of Montrésor.

In 1849, the castle was restored and fitted out by Count Xavier Branicki, a Polish emigrant who, during the Crimean War, accompanied Prince Napoleon to Constantinople and tried to form a Polish regiment.

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 www.37-online.net/

chateaux/montresor.html

The fortress was built in the 11th century by Foulques Nerra, of which there are powerful ramparts dotted with ruined towers. In the center of the enclosure stands the intact residential castle built in the 16th century by Imbert de Bastarnay, Lord of Montrésor.

In 1849, the castle was restored and fitted out by Count Xavier Branicki, a Polish emigrant who, during the Crimean War, accompanied Prince Napoleon to Constantinople and tried to form a Polish regiment.

Saché castle

http://france-valdeloire.com/sache/index.html

This 16th and 18th century castle belonged the last century to M. de Margonne, friend of Balzac, where the writer liked to come and forget the Parisian agitation and the lawsuits of his creditors. “Le Père Goriot” among others was written in Saché. You can see the room where Balzac wrote as well as many of the writer’s manuscripts and personal effects.

More recently, the American sculptor Calder (1898-1976), creator of the famous abstract mobiles, lived in Saché.

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http://france-valdeloire.com/sache/index.html

This 16th and 18th century castle belonged the last century to M. de Margonne, friend of Balzac, where the writer liked to come and forget the Parisian agitation and the lawsuits of his creditors. “Le Père Goriot” among others was written in Saché. You can see the room where Balzac wrote as well as many of the writer’s manuscripts and personal effects.

More recently, the American sculptor Calder (1898-1976), creator of the famous abstract mobiles, lived in Saché.

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The castle of Ussé

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http://www.chateaudusse.fr/

Legend has it that Perrault, looking for a setting for Sleeping Beauty, took Ussé as a model.

A very old fortress to begin with, the current castle dates from the 15th century and underwent many changes of owners, each of which made modifications until the 17th century.

The castle is private and belongs to the Marquis de Blacas.

The castle and gardens of Valmer

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www.chateau-de-valmer.com

Charles VII in the 15th century built the first castle of Valmer. The main castle was destroyed by fire in 1948. There remains the “little Valmer” built in 1647, which reflects the architecture of its time well with its sober lines, stone chains and mansard roofs.

The parks and gardens form a typical ensemble of the 16th and 17th centuries.They are arranged in several terraces following the unevenness of the hillside.

Our tip : Valmer is a must for garden lovers.

Tourist office
of Amboise

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Tourist office
of Chenonceaux

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Tourist office
of Montrichard

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Tourist office
of Tours

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